How to communicate with “Regulars” about your startup

It is ironic that an introvert like me is writing about communication, but here I am.

While working on a startup you meet a lot of other people who are in the same boat or have passed through the phase you are in. At the same time you also meet a lot of people who haven’t heard of Eric Ries, Steve Blank, Convertible Debt, Pivot (maybe they did), MVP, AARRR, Lean Startup and the list goes on. I call these “regular” people or the sane ones. They could be your friends, neighbors, parents of your kids friends, mailman, teller at your bank and sometimes even your own family members.

When one of the “regulars” ask me about what I do, I start thinking about what version of my pitch do I tell them. I used to mention the current “solution” of the problem I was testing with my startup/product. Some times people questioned back about it and asked more details, but usually I got the “OK. Sounds good” response. I believe “OK. Sounds good” is the one of the worst answers to get from a person you are talking about your product. It is most likely think it is stupid or worse they didn’t get what you are doing.

One of the other things about telling “regulars” about the current “solution” you are experimenting is that it is an experiment and most likely will be replaced with another one in a few weeks, if not days. When you meet the same “regulars” again and talk about how you are doing this new experiment now, in their head they validate that you are a loser, you have no idea what you are doing and your product is going nowhere.

A lot of founders say that they don’t care about what people think or say about them or their product as long as they are on the right path and see progress. I disagree. Being a Founder/CEO your job is to make sure that from your grandma to your neighbor’s 5 year old boy should understand what you do to a basic level.

I started testing a few things with “regular” people about 3 weeks ago. I started talking to them about the problem (not the solution) I am trying to solve and in some cases I ask them even before telling what I do about how they find the products they want to buy. How did you know which camera to buy when you bought the last camera? Why did you buy your last camera? These questions are very relevant for RightBuy and help me understand the user’s thought process and current buying/researching habits. Talking about the problem helps me understand how many people have the problem vs. how many don’t even think it is an issue. Earlier, when I talked about what I am trying to solve the conversations went into silence because I talked to them about something they never saw, but something that I live 24/7.

Since then I have noticed a lot of people getting passionate about the problem and talking in detail how they wasted a lot of time and if they can use the application right now. There are also people I meet who haven’t experienced the problem or don’t consider it as a problem. Both kind of people help me understand who can be beta testers for the app and even evangelists.

I would love to hear other ways you talk and engage with consumers/customers who are not early adopters or tech savvy. What kind of questions do you ask them to get honest, constructive, actionable feedback?

You should follow me on Twitter at @gsharma.